• John Fuller
    0
    I think the varicella vaccine is the most problematic vaccine, I'll try to explain this as clearly as possible.

    Varicella, also known as Chickenpox, is a variant of the herpes virus.

    Herpes is generally associated with a rash, but it is in fact a neurological virus. This is not widely known, but statistical research has shown that the cold sores virus (HPV-1) causes minor mental impairment in most people. Herpes infects nerve cells, and the brain contains about 85% of the nerve cells in the human body.

    http://www.medicaldaily.com/herpes-virus-infection-can-cause-memory-loss-cognitive-impairment-along-cold-sores-244772

    Similarly chickenpox can lead to cognitive impairment.

    http://sahlgrenska.gu.se/english/research/news-events/news-article/shingles-underlies-many-infections-in-the-brain.cid1174177

    I'm not advocating in favor of abandoning vaccines altogether. Chickenpox is highly contagious so most people will get it sooner or later. The recommended age for chickenpox vaccination, between 12 and 18 months, seems awfully young however, especially if we consider children typically get the disease much later between the age of 6 and 10.

    Keep in mind that the chickenpox vaccine contains a live virus, and that children have a chance of becoming contagious after receiving the vaccine.

    Common sense suggests that it might be best to wait with the chickenpox vaccine until a child is 4 years old, especially if the child does not have much interaction with other children. The nature of herpes makes chickenpox (and other herpes variants) a much more plausible cause of autism and other cognitive impairments than mercury.
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